MANAGING CAD/CAM/CAE


www.johnstark.com












Manager and supervisor training


Since managers are invariably busy during the working day, it may be most suitable to train them outside of normal working hours, for example, a series of 2- to 3-hour evening sessions. In addition, reading matter can be provided for the managers to work on at the weekend.

The course may be divided into two parts: a common core that is followed by all managers, and then specific sessions that are of particular interest to managers from different parts of the company. The common core would aim to inform managers of the overall objectives and capabilities of CAD/CAM/CAE, discuss management issues in the mixed manual and CAD/CAM/CAE environment, and provide some practical experience. The specific sessions would be tailored to fit the requirements of, for example, an engineering services supervisor, an IS manager, a manager from finance, and a manager from personnel. All of these people would be interested in the common core of the course. However, there are specific topics that would be of interest to each one of them but not to the others.

The need for manager and supervisor training is very rarely appreciated when the system is implemented and is almost never budgeted for in the CAD/CAM/CAE proposal. Yet it is the supervisors and managers who are responsible for ensuring that the perceived benefits are realized.

This type of training addresses managing in a CAD/CAM/CAE environment. It involves understanding issues such as controlling a mixed CAD/CAM/CAE and manual environment, deciding what work should be done using CAD/CAM/CAE and what should be done manually, and ensuring that work is organized and carried out according to procedures.

This course will typically be of a 1- or 2-day duration and should include some practical exercises on project management and resource planning. The course must also include hands-on training so that managers and supervisors can operate the system to the level where they can examine drawings and models and interrogate the database. This gives them the same managing capabilities as they had when all work was done using a drawing board.






Home | Top of page | Front of MANAGING CAD/CAM/CAE section


Page last modified on February 11, 2000
Copyright 1999, 2000 by John Stark